Marin Katusa: Follow the Good Guys in Mining

The most valuable resource in a mining company is often the people. Good management can attract the right investors and add value regardless of the market. In this interview with The Gold Report, Marin Katusa, founder of Katusa Research, shares his litmus test for which mining companies are worth his hard-won dollars and which ones he is avoiding for the foreseeable future.

Gold vs. US Dollar YTD Chart

The Gold Report: You seem much more positive about gold right now than when we talked in June. Based on the chart you have on Katusa Research of the U.S. dollar versus gold and in the wake of the Federal Reserve's inaction at its last meeting, what's your thesis for gold for the rest of 2015?

Marin Katusa: As I said in the spring, I don't see the Fed raising rates this year. Using some simple game theory, for the Fed not to raise rates is the best decision. I still believe that. Gold has fared well compared to the price of the U.S. dollar, better than any other hard commodity. Gold is holding its own. The reality is, because the commodity markets are down, very little capital is being invested to replace the production of gold.

In the long run, I'm very bullish on gold. It's something I'm paying very close attention to through my fund. We've started writing checks on assets that I believe are very cheap and well priced in today's currency commodity markets and that I believe a major will want in its portfolio in a few years. Gold is the currency of kings and silver is the currency of gentlemen; it always has been, and always will be. When you see living legends such as Stanley Druckenmiller and well-known successful fund managers plowing hundreds of millions of dollars into gold, it's obvious gold is appealing at these prices.

TGR: Will the power of gold help the majors or the juniors more? Continue reading "Marin Katusa: Follow the Good Guys in Mining"

Where Have All the Statesmen Gone?

By: Marin Katusa, Chief Energy Investment Strategist

One of the most striking things about the Colder War—as I explore in my new book of the same name—has been the contrast between the peevish tone of the West’s leaders compared to the more grown-up and statesmanlike approach that Putin is taking in international affairs.

Western leaders and their unquestioning media propagandists appear to believe that diplomatic relations are some kind of reward for good behavior. But it’s actually more important to establish a constructive dialogue with your enemies or rivals than your friends, because that’s where you need to find common ground. Indeed, it’s been the basis for diplomacy since time immemorial.

Reassuringly, despite having been the target of the Ukraine crisis rather than the instigator, Putin still sees the West as a potential partner, not an enemy. Nor does, he says, Russia have any interest in building an empire of its own. In theory, if Putin is sincere, there should be plenty of room for cooperation, especially in the fight against terrorism.

As Putin said in his speech at the Valdai International Discussion Club in Sochi in October—whose theme was “The World Order: New Rules or a Game without Rules”—he hasn’t given up on working with the West on shared risks and common goals, provided it’s based on mutual respect and an agreement not to interfere in one another’s domestic affairs.

Putin has, of course, already shown that he can rise above the fray. By negotiating the destruction of Assad’s chemical weapons arsenal under international supervision, he did Obama a big favor and got him off the hook in Syria. Continue reading "Where Have All the Statesmen Gone?"

Marin Katusa: Winter is Coming, How Investors Can Win in the 'Colder War'

The Energy Report: Your book, "The Colder War," is based on the idea that world domination will come through control of the energy economy, and that Russia is winning the fight. How is Russia using the petrodollar to achieve energy supremacy?

Marin Katusa: Under the leadership of President Vladimir Putin, Russia has reestablished itself as the alternative to the American superpower. Putin has aligned himself with nations like China to work in concert against U.S. interests globally. Furthermore, a new bank formed by the BRICS countries Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa will attempt to assert itself as an alternative to the International Monetary Fund.

The Colder War will be a long battle, just like the first Cold War, but in the Colder War, judgment day of the petrodollar will be the critical battle. One must understand global politics and the Colder War to be a successful investor in the energy sector.

TER: What is China's role in this struggle? Continue reading "Marin Katusa: Winter is Coming, How Investors Can Win in the 'Colder War'"

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/gJnfua7lD8s/16354

Hugo Chavez Is Gone, but His Oil Legacy Lives On

On March 5, 2013, Hugo Chávez, one of the most iconic presidents in the world, died at the age of 58. While he was alive, Chávez was a highly controversial figure, calling George W. Bush a drunkard and a "psychologically sick man" and Tony Blair an "imperialist pawn who attempts to curry favor with Danger Bush-Hitler."

Like him or hate him, Chávez definitely had a huge following in Venezuela, as well as the entirety of Latin America. His anti-American and socialistic rhetoric made him an ally of Fidel Castro in Cuba and Ahmadinejad in Iran. Combined with Correa in Ecuador, Fernández in Argentina, and Morales in Bolivia, Chávez was able to make a front in South America against the "evil imperialist gringos."

But with him no longer in the picture, things will change, and cheap Venezuelan oil will be able to flow into the markets, right? Continue reading "Hugo Chavez Is Gone, but His Oil Legacy Lives On"

Putin Is the New Global Shah of Oil

By Marin Katusa, Casey Research

Exxon Mobil is no longer the world's number-one oil producer. As of yesterday, that title belongs to Putin Oil Corp – oh, whoops. I mean the title belongs to Rosneft, Russia's state-controlled oil company.

Rosneft is buying TNK-BP, which is a vertically integrated oil company co-owned by British oil firm BP and a group of Russian billionaires known as AAR. One of the top-ten privately owned oil producers in the world, in 2010 TNK-BP churned out 1.74 million barrels of oil equivalent per day from its assets in Russia and Ukraine and processed almost half that amount through its refineries.

With TNK-BP in its hands, Rosneft will be in charge of more than 4 million barrels of oil production a day. And who is in charge of Rosneft? None other than Vladimir Putin, Russia's resource-full president. Continue reading "Putin Is the New Global Shah of Oil"