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Weak

Do You Practice Quality of Life Investing? Michael Berry Does

The Energy Report: When we last interviewed your son, Chris Berry, he advised to invest based on the reality of a growing, emerging market in China. That included both energy and agriculture sectors. Are you also bullish on quality of life-based (QOL) investing?

Michael Berry: I am bullish; I developed the QOL concept a few years ago. What I'm seeing is quite a few big institution life insurance companies, family offices and money management companies opening quality of life funds, although often with different names. They are beginning to recognize that as people move from the country to the cities in the emerging markets, and a new middle class develops, they will want more animal-based protein chicken, fish, pork, beef and eggs. By 2030, once the credit cycle is corrected, I'm very bullish that quality of life funds are going to push forward. I think both the energy and the agriculture sectors are going to be interesting investment areas.

Chris and I have been spending a fair amount of time lecturing and presenting our QOL thesis and talking to investors and companies that have big stakes in this area. When you have 2 billion (2B) new consumers who want to live longer, healthier and easier, and who want better food, education and transportation, energy and nutrition will be key sectors.

TER: Does that mean that you are not worried about reports of slowing economic growth in China? [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/PMelOWaWzu0/15971

Mike Breard: Buy Small for Deep Profits

The Energy Report: How do you choose the energy names in your coverage list?

Mike Breard: I look for managers with great track records. For example, I attended the annual meeting of Matador Resources Co. (MTDR:NYSE), and there were 150 people there. Normally, only maybe 20 people attend the annual meetings of the junior energy companies, but these folks had been investing with the current managers of Matador in private deals for 30 years. They were so eager to get in on the newest venture of these guys that Matador stock has tripled during the past year.

TER: What is driving Matador's success? [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/RcWkBCCIBBU/15894

Food, Water and Fuel Are Necessary to Life and Investors

The Energy Report: In your Gold Report interview last fall, you said that the two biggest reasons for the erosion of the middle class are peoples' inability to save money due to low interest rates or low wages, and higher taxes, especially the hidden taxes we end up paying.

Bob Moriarty: Yes. I think there are 37 taxes on a loaf of bread. Taxes have increased dramatically over the last 20 years, including what are called the "unclaimed taxes."

In an article James Gruber wrote on peak oil last month, he made the point that debt is actually a future call on energy. Under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, when you owe money, you've already spent the energy. He argues that the economy is an energy system, not a monetary system. He's absolutely correct, in my view.

"The enormous increase in wealth we've seen worldwide over the last 150 years has stopped."

The enormous increase in wealth we've seen worldwide over the last 150 years has stopped. There will be no more growth. From a mathematical point of view, you cannot increase growth. Energy consumption per capita has to go down, and that means wealth goes down. All the debt we've accumulated is a noose around the neck of society.

TER: Gruber also wrote, "Deflation is winning the battle over inflation." His argument is that excessive debt has to be deleveraged and in that deleveraging process, asset values will plummet. Central banks are doing whatever it takes to create inflation in an environment where deflation is really the underlying tide. What do you have to say about that? [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theaureport/Ajgh/~3/YuHKFrOZt48/15852

Get Positioned Now for the Next Great Natural Gas Switch

The Energy Report: Ron, welcome. You are making a presentation at the Money-Show conference in Orlando in late January. What is the gist of your presentation?

Ron Muhlenkamp: The gist of my presentation is that natural gas has become an energy game changer in the U.S. We are cutting the cost of energy in half. This has already happened for homeowners like me who heat their homes with natural gas. We think the next up to benefit is probably the transportation sector.

TER: What is behind this game change? [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/FQcSCOSLwkA/15815

Fracking, Uranium and Solar, Oh My!

Oil Gas: Enhanced Recovery

Nothing catches the market's attention like cushy profit margins. Technologies that enable oil producers to drill more for less money were a notable theme for the experts featured in The Energy Report in 2013.

As Jim Letourneau commented, "Reducing drilling time by 2040% is an easy sell, and the enhanced oil recovery business has a huge market in the field." [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/E3sZavEf6M8/15776

Where to Drill for Portfolio Outperformance

The Energy Report: Chad, you recently released an early look at 2014 titled, Drilling Down for Outperformance. You noted that you saw an average 3540% upside on your Buy-rated names. What are your criteria for picking companies?

Chad Mabry: To start, we use a discounted cash flow-based net asset value (NAV) approach to valuing exploration and production (EP) stocks. While cash flow is an important metric, NAV does a better job of comparing companies with different asset profiles, specifically within the small and midcap EP space. NAV does a better job of accounting for a company's upside potential than cash-flow metrics. We use a bottom-up approach to drill down into a company's asset base, its average type curve, estimated ultimate recoveries (EURs), well costs and so on. In this way we find out about the economics of those plays and what the sensitivities are to our commodity price deck. We then try to sort out companies that aren't being valued appropriately and identify strong risk-reward opportunities.

TER: There has been a lot of commodity price volatility this last year. How do you determine what prices to use when you're estimating NAV? [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/oIiWSD_uX6o/15767

Colorado Floods Highlight Opportunity in Oil and Gas Services

The Energy Report: Jason, how did the recent flash flooding in Colorado impact the Wattenberg oil field?

Jason Wangler: It was a very nasty flood and all the companies on the ground are working hard to assess the damage. There have been reports of tank leakages and other problems. But the wells were turned off during the flood, so drilling operations were not affected much. The questions that remain are how much work is necessary to fix the roads? And when can the drillers safely turn the wells back on?

TER: Given the ever-present possibility of natural disaster, what type of emergency preparations do oil and gas drillers typically take? [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/j96goYkmK3Q/15664

Technical Analysis Toolkit for Energy Investors

The Energy Report: Energy prices are very sensitive to international events, especially conflicts in the Middle East. Do your charts factor in the periodic crises that impact oil and gas prices as buy and sell moments? How do you factor in inflation and interest rate movements into your calculations about which energy juniors look like good buys at any given time?

Clive Maund: The charts do factor in periodic crises that impact oil and gas prices as buy and sell moments, but often in a contrary way. The trick is to gauge when a crisis is at its moment of greatest tension, and while this is not at all easy, the charts can often be a great help in defining such a moment. I will give you an example using a recent call on CliveMaund.com, where the top in oil was pinpointed a day after its occurrence. Some readers may remember an old saying used on the London market many years ago, "Buy on a strike." This refers to a strike by labor, not an oil strike. The underlying psychology of this was that the time of maximum tension and uncertainty, which was when labor unions called the workers out on strike, was the best time to buy stocks, because they would have been falling in anticipation of this, and as tensions later eased as the situation headed to resolution, they would rise again. So it is with conflict and tension situations in the Middle East and their impact on the oil markets. [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/-PIpUrD4Hss/15643

How to Make Money with Clean Tech Energy

The Energy Report: A large number of photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing firms went bankrupt during the past year. What is the outlook for solar energy firms?

Pavel Molchanov: Most of the solar bankruptcies that took place in the U.S., Europe and China have occurred among companies that manufacture solar modules. But it's important to note that a bankrupt company does not necessarily shut down production. About 75% of these companies, as measured by production capacity, have continued to operate, either on a stand-alone basis during bankruptcy or following an acquisition by a strategic partner.

Take, for example, China's Suntech Power Holdings (STP:NYSE). It was the largest solar manufacturer in the world as recently as 2011. It declared bankruptcy in March, and continues to operate and generate revenue. Solyndra, of course, has been wiped off the face of the earth. But such liquidation is a very rare outcome for large solar companies that take temporary refuge in bankruptcy.

TER: Are bankrupt, producing solar companies attractive investments? [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/3wHb0TRU9-Q/15621

Optimistic Banker Sees 'Encouraging Time in the Basins'

The Energy Report: Bruce, the price of natural gas has remained well below $4 per thousand cubic feet ($4/Mcf). How long can junior and midcap explorers and producers (EPs) of natural gas keep on going at this rate?

Bruce Edgelow: They're in a better place than they were a year before. The marketplace isand I'll hesitantly use the word"enjoying" about a 4550% increase in prices year over year. This new price is, for the most part, bringing producers back to a break-even or a modest return on cash flow. However, they clearly need a more robust price to generate the returns that the market expects of them.

TER: The spread between West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and Brent Crude prices has narrowed to just a few dollars per barrel. How is that affecting the crude EPs? [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/Qx_V_yJpdGE/15557

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