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Weak

Which Energy Companies Are Being Added to US Global Funds in Anticipation of an Oil Rebalance?

There are still winners in the energy space, but you have to move quickly. In advance of the rebalance U.S. Global Investors CEO Frank Holmes is expecting toward the end of 2016, he and analyst Samuel Pelaez point to the sectors taking advantage of opportunities, including refiners, midstream MLPs, low-cost producers, airlines and chemical companies. In this interview with The Energy Report, they name their favorites and outline the fundamentals that will make 2016 look a lot different than the year that just ended.

The Energy Report: In a recent Frank Talk, you quoted BCA Research with a prediction that oil markets will rebalance in 2016. What is that based on? [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/9MvhJTRCtsg/16876

How To Profit From Government Mandates In Biofuels

The Energy Report: New proposed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements for the renewable fuel standards (RFS) program could change the landscape for biofuels. What is the new supply-and-demand picture for corn ethanol, biodiesel and sugarcane ethanol?

Brett Wong: This is a proposal, and not a confirmed mandate, which we expect to get by the end of November. The two most important pieces in the standards cover corn ethanol and biodiesel usage requirements. The new proposal for minimum corn ethanol use would be 13.4 billion gallons (13.4 Bgal), which creates a floor. The blendwall, based on Energy Information Administration's (EIA) expectations for gasoline consumption this year, is about 14 Bgal based on 10% ethanol content in gas, which car manufacturers say is a safe level for the fleet. That is the domestic ceiling. This leaves discretionary blending from 13.4 up to 14 Bgal. Beyond that, the demand is from exports, which use up the overall capacity of about 14.7 Bgal. Some people talk about 15 Bgal, but I think that includes some facilities that will never come back on line.

"Renewable Energy Group Inc. could be the biggest winner within the nonintegrated biodiesel providers."

We send a good amount of our ethanol to Canada, which has blending mandates as well. We send some to South America. Brazil has a large blend requirement of 27.5%, which was an increase from 25% last year. That country produces a lot of ethanol from sugarcane, but it has had some rough crop years and must import biofuel to fulfill mandates. There are also more exports going to Asia, where China is trying to clean up its air. [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/QuGSo8H8ihI/16782

How to Profit from Government Mandates in Biofuels

New proposed EPA requirements for the renewable fuel standard program, combined with challenging sugarcane harvests in South America, could increase demand for biodiesel, creating opportunity in a struggling energy sector. In this interview with The Energy Report, Piper Jaffray Analyst Brett Wong names a growing company that could profit from government mandates.

Projected Non-Hydropower Renewable Electricity Generation 2010-15

The Energy Report: New proposed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements for the renewable fuel standards (RFS) program could change the landscape for biofuels. What is the new supply-and-demand picture for corn ethanol, biodiesel and sugarcane ethanol? [Read more...]

Uranium Got You Down? Better Days Are Ahead

The Energy Report: The uranium spot price balloon has lost air again and is back down in the mid-$30/pound (mid-$30/lb) range. It was stalled there for months last year. What pushed the spot price up in the first place? Why is it falling now?

Rob Chang: The uranium spot market is generally pretty thin, and any number of transactions on either the buy or sell side could push it in any direction. What's moved it higher recently could be the news of Japanese reactor restarts happening this summer. A couple of reactors are set to restart in the next few months or so, and we believe that helped push the price along a little bit.

But the spot price really depends on near-term utility demand. I think that's the key point here. In terms of utility demand, according to the numbers that we've seen, globally about 1520% of uranium requirements for 2016 onward are still uncovered. Between now and the end of 2016, there needs to be some buying, either in the spot market or through some other means, to cover those requirements. We saw a bit of a lift because of that need, but certainly there hasn't been a big rush back toward buying uranium ex-spot yet.

TER: I've heard repeatedly that the deficit is going to occur in 2019 or 2020. Why aren't the mining companies moving ahead to address the deficit they know is coming? [Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/rccVBDLG_kY/16685

How to Make Money in the Chaos of Oil and Gas

The Energy Report: Stephane, do you think the oil price has hit bottom and is now recovering?

Stephane Foucaud: When the Brent oil price was close to $50/barrel ($50/bbl), I think it was the bottom. It has recovered quite a bit. There is a risk that it might dip again, but I don't think we will reach the low $50s for quite some time. The reason I think there is a risk that the oil price could dip is that there has been an overreaction to the North American rig fleet reports, and particularly to what appears to be a large number of rigs being taken out of the market. Those rigs are, however, associated with lower-producing areas. Therefore, I think it's more sentiment than reality in terms of impact on the supply. The recovery has been too steep.

TER: What prices are you forecasting for 2015 and 2016?

[Read more...]

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theenergyreport/caoK/~3/yMw_yYAi6co/16542

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