Will Valentine's Day Spoil Cocoa Futures?

Cocoa Futures

Cocoa futures in the May contract settled last Friday in New York at 2472 while currently trading at 2450, down slightly for the week still stuck in an 8-week consolidation pattern looking to break out on some from fresh fundamental news.

Fundamentally speaking, the concern that global cocoa demand will remain weak despite the Ivory Coast government's action to cut prices to boost sales.

Global chocolate demand concerns are negative for cocoa prices. Concerns have increased that Valentine's Day chocolate sales could fall from last year as tighter social distancing rules from the Covid pandemic delay a recovery in chocolate demand.

Cocoa prices are trading slightly below their 20 and 100-day moving average as the trend has turned to the downside. I think prices are just digesting the massive run up in price that we witnessed in November. Cocoa and coffee are the weakest commodities unable to join the rest of the agricultural markets to the upside, so be patient and wait for a trend to develop as trading in a choppy market is extremely difficult over time, so sit on the sidelines.

TREND: MIXED
CHART STRUCTURE: SOLID
VOLATILITY: AVERAGE

S&P 500 Futures

The S&P 500 in the March contract is currently trading lower by 4 points at 3908 after settling last Friday in Chicago at 3880, continuing its bullish momentum. This is a strong demand market as investors continue to put money into the entire equity market, especially the Nasdaq-100, which is at an all-time high once again. Continue reading "Will Valentine's Day Spoil Cocoa Futures?"

Gold & Gold Stock Corrections Are Normal

Corrections in Gold and Gold Stocks are completely normal in an inflationary macro market phase.

Every week I notice the agony ratcheting up incrementally. While the rest of the casino takes off to the speculative heavens, gold sits on its heavy ass and the gold miners go nowhere in a downward-biased perma-correction. Or so it seems. It’s all normal and I’ll explain why.

First of all, it is not healthy to be railing against unseen nefarious manipulative interests. That is emotion and emotion has to be kept out of it (and yes, I get as aggravated as the next guy sometimes, but it cannot affect your plan or you will be the victim, the mark). You have to take what the market gives you and roll with it. All markets are manipulated when you consider that the greatest manipulation of all is courtesy of the Federal Reserve, implementing it's MMT (Modern Monetary Theory), err, that is TMM (Total Market Manipulation) toward desired ends.

The primary tool in that manipulation is inflation. The oldest trick in the Fed’s book. But they can only inflate under cover of a deflationary macro and the 2020 COVID-crash made that the story and as yet it’s a condition that keeps on giving license to the inflators. But very likely sometime in 2021, our indicators will signal a failure into another deflationary liquidation or a more intense inflationary problem, neither of which would be positive for the economy. Continue reading "Gold & Gold Stock Corrections Are Normal"

Records, Records and More Records

Stocks will end this record-setting week at or near record levels, with the S&P 500 gaining +.9% for the week, the DOW +.8%, and the NASDAQ outperforming with a gain of +1.4%. The records set this week by the three main indexes are as follows, S&P 500 - 1,931.50, DOW - 31,543.82, and the NASDAQ - 14,109.12.

On a weekly level, the market started hot on Monday but has steadily cooled off into the close on Friday after the record levels were achieved. As we head into the finale, the S&P 500 is looking at a daily gain of roughly +.10, the DOW has been waffling between gains and losses and is down about -.11% as I recorded this video, and the NASDAQ is up the same as the S&P 500 with an increase of +.10%. Continue reading "Records, Records and More Records"

Will 2021 Prompt A Big Rotation In Sector Trends? - Part 2

In the first part of this research article, we attempted to provide some details to the question of “sector trends in 2021 and what may shift over the next 10 to 12+ months”. In that section of this article, we covered the broad market sector trends and highlighted how the COVID-19 virus event changed the way the global economy functioned for 8+ months. It also highlighted a number of trends that were already taking place in the global market – Technology, Healthcare, Discretionary, and Comm. Services. Quite literally, the past 20+ years have been a digital revolution for most of the world and that is not likely to change.

What will likely change is the demand for Commodities, Raw Materials, Agriculture, and Manufacturing/Distribution related to these core materials. We believe any resurgence of the global economy post-COVID-19 will consist of a resurgence in the demand for commodities and raw/basic materials as consumers extend their normal consumption growth at exceptional rates.

The question in our minds is how will this transition take place and over how much time? Will it happen suddenly as new global policy and restructuring take place? Will it happen more slowly as the global economy re-engages and rebuilds? Will it happen aggressively, disrupting other sector trends? Will it happen in a way that supports continued growth and appreciation of major sector trends? Continue reading "Will 2021 Prompt A Big Rotation In Sector Trends? - Part 2"

General Motors Announcement Changes Everything

We all know Tesla (TSLA) is a run-away train, but what if I told you General Motors (GM) could soon be not only chasing down Elon Musk but maybe passing him?

OK, all of the Tesla fanatics need to take a deep breath and calm down. The thinking that another “car” company could pass Tesla is not a negative comment against Tesla; it’s the reality that we are now living in a world where electric and other alternative energy vehicles are not “pipe” dreams but reality.

The late January announcement from General Motors that they will no longer sell internal combustion engine vehicles in the United States by 2035 is the writing on the wall that gasoline is ending and EV’s will dominate the road. In 2020 Tesla delivered 499,550 vehicles, which shows that we have demand for EVs even now. Perhaps not like the demand that GM still has for gasoline-powered vehicles. GM sold 7.7 million in 2019, down from the 8.3 million it had sold in 2018 and way off its high of just over 10 million in 2016. These are worldwide sales figures, but regardless GM sold 2.5 million vehicles in the US in 2020.

What’s the point of these figures? Continue reading "General Motors Announcement Changes Everything"