CVS Health Check - Stock Appears To Be Consolidating

Noah Kiedrowski - INO.com Contributor - Biotech


Introduction

It’s time for a health check for CVS Health Corporation (NYSE:CVS) after reporting its most recent quarterly earnings and seeing its stock move in a wide range over the past few months. CVS reported what was ostensibly another great quarter and full-year numbers, reporting a full-year increase of 25.1%, 13.2% and 11.7% in free cash flow, EPS and revenue, respectively. After reporting its Q4 earnings, CVS held steady in contrast to the massive 17% sell-off after reporting its Q3 numbers, moving down from $84 to $70. I’ve written several articles contending that CVS presents a compelling investment opportunity in the ever expanding healthcare space. My investment thesis was based on sector consolidation, aging population and growth in long-term care facilities in combination with the fact that CVS has been highly acquisitive, continues to deliver robust earnings growth, revenue growth, growing dividends and has an aggressive share buyback program in place. With its recent acquisitions of Target’s pharmacies and Omnicare, these proactive measures will significantly expand its presence and ability to dispense prescriptions to the general public and in long-term care facilities. As health care costs and prescription drug costs continue to rise and the population continues to age with the elderly comprising a larger segment of the overall population, CVS looked poised to benefit. However, during the Q3 earnings call CVS noted that recent marketplace trends had forced CVS to cut guidance for Q4 2016 and the full-year 2017 numbers. This guide-down negatively impacted shares however the long-term narrative remains intact. CVS has strong fundamentals and growth and I felt that the previous sell-off after the Q3 release was an overreaction. Since then, Q4 numbers have been released and the share price has retraced the low $80 range and appears to be consolidating for another move up. Continue reading "CVS Health Check - Stock Appears To Be Consolidating"

Realizing Gains Without Owning Shares Via Leveraging Cash

Noah Kiedrowski - INO.com Contributor - Biotech


Introduction

I’ve written many articles highlighting the advantages options trading and how this technique, when deployed in opportunistic or conservative scenarios may augment overall portfolio returns while mitigating risk in a meaningful manner. Here I’d like to focus on leveraging cash-on-hand to engage in options trading, more specifically selling covered puts. In laymen’s terms, I’ll cover option variables, an example, strategy and empirical results with commentary.

The Questions

1. Why buy a stock now when you can purchase the stock in the future at a lower price while being paid to do so?

2. Why buy stocks at all when you can make money on the underlying volatility without ever owning the shares?

Overview

Timing the market has proven to be very difficult if not altogether impossible. However creating opportunities to lock-in downward movement in a given stock one is looking to own is possible. If a stock of interest has substantially fallen to at or near a 52-week low, then one has an option to “buy” the stock at an even lower price at a later date while collecting premium income in the process. Alternatively, it's also possible to make money on the option itself without owning any shares of the company via realizing options premium gains as the underlying stock appreciates in value off its lows. This is called a covered put option, covered in the sense that one has cash to back the option contract. Leveraging covered put options in opportunistic scenarios may augment overall portfolio returns while mitigating risk when looking to initiate a future position in an individual stock. In the event of a covered put, this is accomplished by leveraging the cash one currently has by selling a put contract against those funds for a premium. It's also possible to make money on the option itself without owning any shares of the company via realizing options premium gains as the underlying stock appreciates in value. Continue reading "Realizing Gains Without Owning Shares Via Leveraging Cash"

High-Quality Secured Puts Yield 20% Return

Noah Kiedrowski - INO.com Contributor - Biotech


Overview

I’ve written many articles highlighting the advantages options trading and how this technique, when deployed in opportunistic or conservative scenarios may augment overall portfolio returns while mitigating risk in a meaningful manner. Timing the market has proven to be very difficult if not altogether impossible. However creating opportunities to lock-in the downward movement in a given stock one is looking to own is possible. If a stock of interest has substantially fallen to near a 52-week low, then one has an option to “buy” the stock at an even lower price at a later date while collecting premium income in the process. Alternatively, it's also possible to make money on the option itself without owning any shares of the company via realizing options premium gains as the underlying stock appreciates in value off its lows. This is called a covered or secured put option, covered in the sense that one has cash to back the option contract. Leveraging covered or secured put options in opportunistic scenarios may augment overall portfolio returns while mitigating risk when looking to initiate a future position in an individual stock or looking to make money on the potential appreciation without owning the stock. In the event of a covered put, this is accomplished by leveraging the cash one currently has by selling a put contract against those funds for a premium. Why buy a stock now when you can purchase the stock in the future at a lower price while being paid to do so? Why buy stocks at all when you can make money on the underlying volatility without ever owning the shares? Continue reading "High-Quality Secured Puts Yield 20% Return"

CVS - Overreaction or Justified Selloff?

Noah Kiedrowski - INO.com Contributor - Biotech


Introduction

CVS Health (NYSE:CVS) recently reported what was ostensibly another great quarter reporting a year-over-year increase of 28% and 16% in EPS and revenue, respectively. After reporting its Q3 earnings, CVS sold off 17%, moving down from $84 to $70 at market open. I’ve written several articles putting forth the case that CVS presents a compelling investment opportunity in the growing healthcare space. My investment thesis was based on the fact that CVS has been highly acquisitive, continues to deliver robust earnings growth, revenue growth, growing dividends and has an aggressive share buyback program in place. With its recent acquisitions of Target’s pharmacies and Omnicare, these proactive measures will significantly expand its presence and ability to dispense prescriptions to the general public and in long-term care facilities. As healthcare costs and prescription drug costs continue to rise and the population continues to age with the elderly comprising a larger segment of the overall population, CVS looked poised to benefit. Recent marketplace trends have forced CVS to cut guidance for Q4 2016 and the full-year 2017 numbers. Given this dichotomy between the company’s historically strong fundamentals and share price, was this an overreaction or was the selloff justified? Continue reading "CVS - Overreaction or Justified Selloff?"

CVS Delivers Strong Second Quarter

Noah Kiedrowski - INO.com Contributor - Biotech


Introduction

CVS Health Corporation (NYSE:CVS) recently announced fantastic Q2 2016 numbers across the board. Increased EPS growth, revenue and free cash flow coupled with dividends and share buybacks bode well for CVS investors. CVS’s acquisitions of Target pharmacies and Omnicare are becoming fully integrated under the CVS umbrella. Collectively, these are great attributes that drive shareholder value over the long-term. I’ve written several articles presenting a compelling investment opportunity in the growing healthcare space via CVS. My investment thesis is based on the fact that CVS has been highly acquisitive, continues to deliver robust earnings growth, revenue growth, growing dividends and has an aggressive share buyback program in place. CVS recently reported fantastic quarterly results for Q2 2016 in 2016, positioning itself for long-term success. With its recent acquisitions of Target’s pharmacies and Omnicare, these proactive measures will significantly expand its presence and ability to dispense prescriptions to the general public and in long-term care facilities. As healthcare costs continue to rise (specifically prescription drug costs) and the population continues to age with the elderly comprising a larger segment of the overall population, CVS looks poised to benefit. The release of its Q2 2016 earnings reiterates this premise while the company is maintaining its growth narrative. I content that CVS will continue to deliver sustained growth and position itself for long-term success to drive shareholder value. Continue reading "CVS Delivers Strong Second Quarter"