Investing Like a Billionaire: Everything Berkshire Hathaway Offers to Ordinary Investors

With a $867.46 billion market cap, Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.A) (BRK.B), a diversified holding company, is led by Warren Edward Buffett, who is one of the world’s renowned investors with a long track record of successful capital allocation and value creation. As of May 8, 2024, he has a net worth of $133.50 billion, making him the eighth-richest person in the world.

Buffett’s substantial wealth primarily stems from his significant holdings in Berkshire Hathaway, a conglomerate with assets exceeding $1 trillion. Under Buffett’s expertise and exceptional leadership, Berkshire has historically delivered robust and consistent long-term growth, outperforming various other investment options.

From 1965, when Warren Buffett took control of the company, to 2023, Berkshire’s share price surged by a staggering 4,384,748%, surpassing the total return of the S&P 500 with dividends included of 31,223%. Additionally, Berkshire has continued its solid performance into 2024, with a double-digit percentage gain.

Berkshire’s Portfolio Reflects Buffett’s Investment Strategy

Known as the “Oracle of Omaha,” Warren Buffett stands out as one of the most accomplished investors of all time. He follows the Benjamin Graham school of value investing, seeking out securities with unreasonably low prices compared to their intrinsic worth. He often assesses the company’s long-term potential rather than short-term market trends.

Buffett considers company performance, profit margins, management team, and business model. He believes in investing in high-quality businesses with solid competitive advantages or “economic moats,” enabling them to maintain or expand their market share over time.

Sticking to his investment policy, Buffett’s holding company, Berkshire Hathaway, aims to “buy ably-managed businesses” possessing various characteristics, such as enduring competitive advantage, at extremely low prices.

For instance, the acquisition of See’s Candies in 1972 demonstrated Buffett’s strategy, as the company's robust brand and loyal customer base made it a highly profitable long-term investment. He favors companies with strong brands and business models that own their market niche, creating formidable barriers for competitors trying to enter and beat them at their game.

Berkshire Offers Diversification Across Industries

Berkshire Hathaway’s top holding is Apple Inc. (AAPL). Thanks to its strong brand and customer loyalty, it has remained one of Buffett’s favorite stocks for a long time. He has previously referred to AAPL as the “best business I know in the world.”

BRK.B recently disclosed that it had cut its stake in Apple by around 13% in the first quarter. It was reported that Berkshire’s Apple bet was worth $135.4 billion, implying nearly 790 million shares. Despite this trim, the iPhone maker is still Berkshire’s biggest holding by far, with a 39.8% weight in its publicly traded portfolio.

Another consumer goods company that Buffett loves is The Coca-Cola Company (KO). He recognized the company’s iconic brand, attractive dividends, and market advantages. Coca-Cola’s robust brand has enabled it to mitigate the impact of inflation by transferring higher costs to customers while still being able to generate growth.

At around 6.9%, KO is the fourth-largest holding in Berkshire’s portfolio. Berkshire owns a 9.3% stake in the company.

Meanwhile, Warren Buffett holds significant investments in the energy sector. During the fourth quarter of 2023, Buffett’s Berkshire increased its stakes in two major oil and gas companies, Chevron Corporation (CVX) and Occidental Petroleum Corporation (OXY).

Berkshire Hathaway owns about a 6.7% stake in CVX. According to Berkshire’s February shareholder letter, the firm also holds a 27.8% stake in OXY and has warrants to increase its ownership further at a fixed price.

Chevron (about 5.5% of the portfolio’s total weight) and Occidental (4.5%) provide investors with exceptionally good returns amid the inflationary periods and pay attractive dividends.

In addition, Buffett is fond of financial institutions and insurance companies, viewing them as a strategic bet on the long-term health of the U.S. economy. Berkshire's top two financial holdings are Bank of America Corporation (BAC) and American Express Company (AXP). These financial stocks comprise approximately 21% of the Berkshire portfolio’s total weight.

Outstanding First-Quarter Operating Earnings and Record Cash Hoard

For the first quarter that ended March 31, 2024, Berkshire’s total revenues increased 5.3% year-over-year to $89.87 billion. Revenues from Railroad, Utilities and Energy rose 11.2% year-over-year, and revenues from Insurance and Other grew 3.2%.

The Warren Buffett-led conglomerate reported first-quarter operating profit, which encompasses earnings from the company’s wholly-owned businesses, grew 39% from the year-ago period to $11.22 billion. This remarkable surge was led by a 185% year-over-year increase in insurance underwriting earnings to $2.60 billion. Insurance investment also soared 32% to over $2.50 billion.

However, net earnings attributable to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders declined by 64.2% year-over-year to $12.70 billion.

During the first quarter, the company’s cash pile reached a record high of $188.99 billion, up from $167.60 billion in the fourth quarter.

“We had much-improved earnings in insurance underwriting. And then our investment income was almost certain to increase,” Buffett said at Berkshire’s annual shareholder meeting in Omaha, Nebraska. “And I said that in the annual report because yields are so much higher than they were last year. And we have a lot of fixed, short-term investments that are very responsive to the changes in interest rates.”

Bottom Line

Berkshire Hathaway, led by a well-known investor, Warren Buffett, follows an intrinsic value investing approach, aiming at buying undervalued companies with solid fundamentals, competitive advantages, and long-term growth potential. Berkshire owns a diverse portfolio of businesses, including insurance, utilities, transportation, retail, and technology, among others.

Moreover, Berkshire’s top five holdings pay attractive dividends, which indicates Warren Buffett’s interest in stocks that offer a stable income stream.

Buffett’s conglomerate recently reported a significant surge in operating earnings in the first quarter of fiscal 2024, primarily driven by an increase in insurance underwriting earnings and a record cash pile that nears $200 billion.

USB analyst Brian Meredith maintained a Buy rating on Berkshire, citing the recent earnings beat and noting that Geico is on track to catch up to rivals Progressive and others on data analytics by 2025.

Berkshire Hathaway has historically delivered impressive and consistent returns. From 1965 to 2023, its share price skyrocketed 4,384,748%, more than 140 times the total return of the S&P 500, with dividends included. Moreover, Berkshire shares have already outperformed this year, with each share class having advanced more than 12%, while the S&P is up by nearly 8%.

Shares of BRK.B have gained approximately 16% over the past six months and more than 22% over the past year.

Looking ahead, analysts expect BRK.B’s EPS for the fiscal year (ending December 2024) to increase 14.6% year-over-year to $19.70. Further, the company’s EPS and revenue for the fiscal year 2025 are expected to grow 1.4% and 5.6% from the prior year to $19.97 and $376.61 billion, respectively.

Thus, by owning BRK.B shares, investors can gain exposure to Berkshire’s diversified portfolio of businesses, Buffett’s expertise, and stable growth and performance.

Warren Buffett's Oil Investments: Insights Into Berkshire Hathaway's Oil Holdings

Warren Buffett, a prominent billionaire investor known for his investments through Berkshire Hathaway, holds significant investments in the oil sector, with holdings in Chevron Corporation (CVX) and Occidental Petroleum (OXY).

Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.A) (BRK.B) owns 126.1 million shares of CVX, valued at $1.5 billion. This ownership stake represents about 6.7% of the company’s outstanding shares.

Berkshire’s purchase of shares in CVX during the fourth quarter of 2023 is seen as a significant endorsement of Chevron’s $53 billion merger with Hess Corporation (HES), announced on October 23. This move is interpreted as a strong vote of confidence for Chevron's investors and the oil and gas sector as a whole.

Additionally, per Berkshire Hathaway’s February shareholder letter, the multinational investment firm holds a 27.8% stake in OXY and has warrants that could increase its ownership further at a fixed price.

“We particularly like its vast oil and gas holdings in the United States, as well as its leadership in carbon-capture initiatives, though the economic feasibility of this technique has yet to be proven,” Buffett said, “Both of these activities are very much in our country’s interest.”

In November, Occidental Petroleum and BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, announced a joint investment of $550 million in Occidental’s direct air capture plant, Stratos, located in West Texas. The plant is anticipated to commence operations by the middle of the upcoming year.

Direct air capture (DAC) technology differs from traditional carbon capture methods because it extracts carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere instead of capturing emissions at the source, such as at industrial facilities like steel plants.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), 27 DAC plants have been commissioned globally to date, with plans for at least 130 DAC facilities in several stages of development. Both Occidental Petroleum and Exxon Mobil Corp (XOM) estimate that DAC could evolve into a multi-trillion-dollar market for oil producers by 2050 as scale brings costs down.

Warren Buffett has expressed admiration for Vicki Hollub, the President and CEO of Occidental Petroleum, who is the first woman to lead a major American oil company. “Under Vicki Hollub’s leadership, Occidental is doing the right things for both its country and its owners,” Buffett stated. “No one knows what oil prices will do over the next month, year, or decade.”

“But Vicki does know how to separate oil from rock, and that’s an uncommon talent, valuable to her shareholders and her country,” he added.

Understanding the Dynamics of the Energy Sector

Also, Berkshire's investments consider the dynamics of the energy sector, including factors such as supply and demand trends, geopolitical events, and technological advancements. Oil prices climbed above $90 per barrel last week. This surge was attributed to tensions in the Middle East, concerns regarding tightening supply, and optimistic expectations about demand growth amid improving economies.

Brent crude passed around $91 per barrel on Friday, taking its gains for the year to 18%. The U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude, closely linked to U.S. gasoline prices, has been even stronger, with 21% gains. Both benchmark crude oil prices settled at their highest levels since October 2023.

The oil market could see prices rise to $100 per barrel, especially if OPEC+ maintains its production cuts and extends them further into the second half of the year. This scenario is supported by expectations of robust demand, particularly in the second half, driven by economic growth and increased consumption.

Vitol’s Muller told on Gulf Intelligence’s Daily Energy Markets podcast that he anticipates a significant uptick in refined product demand globally, at around 2 million barrels per day (bpd) than in the same period last year.

This bullish outlook is echoed by experts like Bob McNally, founder of consultancy Rapidan Energy and a former White House adviser, who told Bloomberg Television in an interview that the market is currently “on firm fundamental footing.”

“I think $100 oil is entirely real — it just requires a little more risk pricing on the true geopolitical risk,” McNally added.

Now, let’s review the fundamentals of CVX and OXY in detail:

Chevron Corporation (CVX)

With a $299.80 billion market cap, CVX engages in integrated energy and chemicals operations internationally. It produces crude oil and natural gas; manufactures transportation fuels, lubricants, petrochemicals, and additives; and develops technologies that enhance its business and the industry.

The company also aims to grow its traditional oil and gas business, lower the carbon intensity of its operations, and expand its new lower carbon business in renewable fuels, hydrogen, carbon capture, and other emerging technologies.

On April 4, Chevron New Energies (CNE), a CVX division, announced a lead investment in ION Clean Energy (ION), a Boulder-based tech company that provides post-combustion point-source capture technology through its third-generation ICE-31 liquid amine system. ION raised $45 million in Series A financing led by CNE. 

“We continue to make progress on our goal to deliver the full value chain of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) as a business, and we believe ION is a part of this solution,” said Chris Powers, vice president of CCUS & Emerging with CNE.

Also, on March 19, CNE and JX Nippon Oil & Gas Exploration Corporation signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) that offers a framework to evaluate the export of Carbon Dioxide (CO₂) from Japan to Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects located in Australia and other countries in the Asia Pacific region.

For the fourth quarter ended December 31, 2023, CVX’s total revenues and other income declined 16.5% year-over-year to $47.18 billion. Its total adjusted earnings and adjusted EPS decreased 17.8% and 15.6% over the prior-year quarter to $6.45 billion and $3.5, respectively.

However, the company’s worldwide and U.S. net oil-equivalent production set annual records. Worldwide production increased 4% from a year ago to more than 3.1 barrels of oil-equivalent per day, primarily due to the acquisition of PDC Energy, Inc. (PDC) and growth in the Permian Basin, up 10% from 2022. This was led by 14% growth in the U.S.

Last year, CVX returned more cash to shareholders and produced more oil and gas than any other year in the company’s history. Cash returned to shareholders was nearly $26 billion for the full year, 18% higher than the prior year’s total.

The company’s Board of Directors further declared an 8% increase in the quarterly dividend to $1.63 per share, paid on March 11, 2024, to all holders of common stock, as shown on the transfer records of the corporation at the close of business on February 16, 2024.

CVX’s annual dividend of $6.52 translates to a yield of 4.03% on the current share price. Its four-year average dividend yield is 4.43%. Moreover, the company’s dividend payouts have increased at CAGRs of 6.08% and 6.3% over the past three and five years, respectively.

For 2024, CVX announced an expected organic capital expenditure range of $15.5 to $16.5 billion for consolidated subsidiaries (capex) and an affiliate capital expenditure (affiliate capex) budget of around $3 billion. With the acquisition of PDC Energy, Chevron announced an annual capex guidance range of $14 to $16 billion through 2027.

Following the completion of the Hess acquisition, which is expected to be finalized in the first half of 2024, CVX’s annual capex budget is expected to increase significantly to a range of $19 billion to $22 billion.

Analysts expect CVX’s revenue for the fiscal year (ending December 2024) to increase by 1.8% year-over-year to $204.64 billion. However, the consensus EPS estimate of $12.82 for the current year indicates a decline of 2.4% year-over-year.

Occidental Petroleum Corporation (OXY)

With a market cap of $60.94 billion, OXY is a global energy company with assets primarily in the U.S., the Middle East, and North Africa. The company is one of the largest oil and gas producers in the U.S., including a leading producer in the Permian and DJ basins and offshore Gulf of Mexico. 

On February 8, OXY’s Board of Directors declared a regular quarterly dividend of $0.22 per share on common stock, payable on April 15, 2024, to stockholders of record at the close of business on March 8, 2024. The annual dividend per share has increased to $0.88 from its previous rate of $0.72.

OXY’s annual dividend translates to a yield of 1.27% on the current share price. Its four-year average yield is 3.44%. The company’s dividend payments have grown at a CAGR of 5.7% over the past three years.

On December 11, 2023, OXY entered a purchase agreement to acquire Midland-based oil and gas producer CrownRock L.P., a joint venture of CrownQuest Operating LLC and Lime Rock Partners. This acquisition is anticipated to deliver increased free cash flow on a share basis, including $1 billion in the first year based on $70 per barrel WTI.

The acquisition further complements and strengthens Occidental’s leading Permian portfolio by adding around 170 thousand barrels of oil equivalent per day (Mboed) of high-margin, lower-decline unconventional production in 2024 and approximately 1,700 undeveloped locations. It enhances the company’s resource base and growth potential in the region.

During the fourth quarter that ended December 31, 2023, OXY’s revenues and other income decreased 9.6% year-over-year to $7.53 billion. Its income before income taxes declined 35% from the prior year’s quarter to $1.56 billion. Its non-GAAP EPS came in at $0.74, down 54% year-over-year.

Furthermore, the company’s current liabilities increased to $9.15 billion as of December 31, 2023, compared to $7.76 billion as of December 31, 2022.

Street expects OXY’s revenue and EPS for the first quarter (ending March 2024) to decline 9.4% and 45.8% year-over-year to $6.58 billion and $0.59, respectively. For the fiscal year 2024, the consensus EPS estimate of $3.37 indicates a decrease of 8.9% year-over-year.

However, the company’s revenue for the ongoing year is expected to increase 2.5% year-over-year to $29.63 billion.

Bottom Line

Warren Buffett’s investments in the oil sector through Berkshire Hathaway have garnered attention, particularly with holdings in CVX and OXY. Hathaway’s oil investments are also aligned with the demand-supply dynamics in the energy sector. The recent surge in oil prices, driven by tensions in the Middle East, supply constraints, and an optimistic demand outlook, reflects the evolving landscape that Buffett’s investments navigate.

While rising oil prices, production growth, strategic acquisitions and investments, and continued commitment to rewarding shareholders via dividends make CVX an attractive option for long-term investors seeking growth, the company continues to face several challenges, including commodity price dependence, higher operational costs, and uncertainty in the energy transition.

Chevron's core business in oil and gas exploration (upstream) makes it susceptible to boom-and-bust cycles in commodity prices. The company’s earnings dropped in 2023 due to lower oil and gas prices and reduced refining profits, highlighting the ongoing challenge of staying profitable amid market changes. Also, analysts have presented a mixed outlook for 2024.

CVX also faces cost headwinds, with its operating expenses trending upward and inflationary pressures threatening to squeeze margins further. Moreover, the global shift toward renewable energy presents a long-term challenge for oil and gas companies. 

Regarding OXY, its investments in low-carbon ventures, strategic acquisitions, and technology advancements present numerous opportunities for growth and industry leadership. However, the company must also tackle challenges related to its reliance on commodity prices, managing operational costs and debt obligations, and navigating global economic uncertainties.

While Occidental’s last reported earnings topped analyst estimates, they dropped compared to year-ago values. Further, analysts appear bearish about the company’s financial performance this year.

Staying profitable in such a volatile environment requires strategic resilience, efficient cost management, and a focus on operational excellence to navigate through boom-and-bust cycles effectively. So, given the mixed performance and outlook for CVX and OXY, investors may consider waiting for a better entry point before investing in these stocks.

While Buffett’s endorsement and long-term investment strategy hold weight, it’s essential to assess the companies’ financial health, growth prospects, and industry trends comprehensively.

Impact of Lackluster Earnings on XOM and CVX -- What's Next for the Energy Stocks?

Oil behemoths Exxon Mobil Corporation (XOM) and Chevron Corporation (CVX) recently reported third-quarter results, indicating enduring difficulties in accelerating oil production growth. Earnings have significantly dropped from the year-ago quarter, failing to meet the Wall Street projections. Nonetheless, both firms reported an upswing in earnings quarterly.

XOM's oil production has tumbled, while CVX has faced setbacks impacting key growth endeavors in Kazakhstan and the major hubs of oil production, including the Permian Basin in West Texas and New Mexico.

The market reaction to the earnings reports was swift and severe. CVX’s shares plunged about 7%, and a descent of 1.9% in XOM's shares was observed despite rising oil prices due to escalating tensions in the Middle East. This response underscores investor anxieties about these fossil fuel behemoths' long-term viability and fiscal discipline relative to sectors like technology.

Both companies confirmed technical issues in the Permian region, including constraints on wastewater production, high concentrations of carbon dioxide in natural gas, and challenges encountered by production partners during fracking operations. The complications of oil production expansion, coupled with operational problems, are anticipated to influence a surge in industry-wide costs.

However, not all seems grim for the oil corporations. The oil majors are reportedly amplifying their capital investments within the oil and gas sector, undeterred by growing global consensus on a shift towards clean energy alternatives. The acquisitions underscore the enduring interest of the oil companies in profitable oil and gas ventures.

These strategic moves suggest that these corporations do not anticipate a decline in oil demand in the future. Instead, they lean toward believing that oil's role will remain pivotal in the world's energy matrix for the foreseeable future.

The International Energy Agency's (IEA) forecast of oil demand peaking by 2030 amid expanded use of renewable energy sources. The prediction undermines the justification for increased expenditure on fossil fuels and further prompts the question of why cash-rich oil titans are not pivoting toward green energy ventures.

The answer lies partly in the clean energy transition being a long-term, costly process, complicated further by the current economic backdrop of persistent inflation, escalating borrowing expenses, and continual supply chain difficulties.

For the past two years, geopolitical instability – from Russia's military aggression in Ukraine to long-standing conflicts in the Middle East, has fostered unpredictability in energy prices. This has prompted concerns over energy demand, infusing uncertainties in the market. Additionally, easing oil and natural gas prices has exacerbated the profitability challenges of XOM and CVX.

A cautious approach has pervaded the market, with participants adopting a vigilant stance, awaiting the outcomes of pivotal events, including the U.S. Federal Reserve policy meeting and China’s latest manufacturing data.

In its most recent Commodity Markets Outlook, the World Bank projected global oil prices to reach around $90 a barrel during the last quarter of the year before diminishing to an average of $81 a barrel throughout the coming year as global economic growth decelerates. Such a decline could cast a shadow over the financial health of XOM and CVX.

These corporations, heavily vested in the extraction and sale of oil and gas, stand at risk of substantial revenue reductions, which could compromise their net profitability. Dwindling prices could pose formidable challenges for these companies in securing funds for new ventures and investments, jeopardizing their future profitability.

On the flip side, however, OPEC+ and Russia’s prolonged production cuts, in addition to the geopolitical turmoil, could exacerbate supply chain disruptions, propelling oil and gas prices in the future. This development creates a conducive climate for extraction and ensuing production activities.

Let’s see some other factors that have the potential to influence the stocks’ performance in the near term:

Exxon Mobil Corporation (XOM)

With a market cap of over $419 billion, XOM explores and produces crude oil and natural gas in the United States and internationally.

The cash influx enabled XOM to authorize a $60 billion acquisition of Pioneer, which attracted international media attention. Experts predict the strategic maneuver could boost XOM's domestic oil production twofold, catapulting the company into the top tier of American producers. It could stimulate added consolidation within this fragmented sector, strengthening American shale producers' role as the commanding players in the international oil market.

However, XOM's third-quarter profits fell by over half of its record high last year due to a decline in oil and gas price realizations, although the company's refinery throughput rose to 4.2 million barrels a day, the most since XOM merged with Mobil 24 years ago. The energy giant’s revenue slid 19% year-over-year to $90.76 billion, while non-GAAP earnings per share reached $2.27, falling short of analysts' predictions.

The dwindling profits were influenced by an approximately 60% decrease in natural gas price realizations and a 14% reduction in oil price realizations. The company also reported a 69.9% decline in earnings from its chemical products division due to increased feedstock prices and overproduction.

In the quarter, it returned $8.1 billion to the shareholders, comprising $3.7 billion in dividends and $4.4 billion in share buybacks.

Moreover, XOM announced an increase in its fourth-quarter dividend to $0.95 per share, payable on December 11, honoring its excellent history of shareholder returns. A testament to the company's reputation is its consistent record of paying dividends for 40 uninterrupted years.

Its annual dividend rate of $3.80 per share translates to a dividend yield of 3.60% on the current share prices. The company’s dividend payouts have grown at a CAGR of 1.5% over the past three years and 2.7% over the past five years.

The stock trades lower than the 50-, 100-, and 200-day moving averages, indicating a downtrend. However, Wall Street analysts expect the stock to reach $128.32 in the next 12 months, indicating a potential upside of 21.6%. The price target ranges from a low of $105 to a high of $150.

Institutions hold roughly 60.4% of XOM shares. Of the 3,637 institutional holders, 1,589 have increased their positions in the stock. Moreover, 147 institutions have taken new positions (9,154,521 shares).

For the fiscal fourth quarter ending December 2023, analysts expect its revenue and EPS to be $92.28 billion and $2.20, respectively.

Chevron Corporation (CVX)

Boasting a market cap of over $275 billion, CVX offers administrative, financial management, and technology support services for energy and chemical operations.

The firm's recent $53 billion acquisition of Hess, recognized as one of the largest operators in North Dakota's Bakken shale play, substantiates its massive investment amid the global shift towards cleaner energy. Even though this transaction could slightly increase the region's oil production, industry analysts do not anticipate a revival to its peak pre-pandemic boom days.

Bakken oil production is anticipated to drop to 1.15 million bpd from 2026 and remain stagnant until 2030. A slow decay will follow this due to depleting reserves. It is yet to be ascertained if an infusion of new investments or technological advancements can counteract a longer-term decrease in Bakken output.

CVX also emphasizes the importance of consistent dividend distribution, demonstrating an unwavering commitment to operational diversity, having done so for an impressive 35 consecutive years. This reliability is quite remarkable considering the unpredictable nature of the energy sector.

In 2023, the company paid a dividend of $6.04 per share, which translates to a dividend yield of 4.18% on the current share prices. The company’s dividend payouts have grown at a CAGR of 5.6% over the past three years and 6% over the past five years. Although, it is worth noting that the decline in dividend payout rate over time might adversely influence investors seeking a steady source of passive income.

CVX adopts a moderate approach concerning leverage. During periods with low oil prices, the company can incur debt to finance its capital investment needs and maintain dividend payouts. When energy prices rebound, which historically they always have, the company can offset the debt. This prudent strategy offers reassurance to even the most conservative investors about the integrity of the company's dividend capabilities.

For the fiscal third quarter that ended September 30, 2023, CVX's upstream production segment earnings dipped 38.2% year-over-year to $5.76 billion. However, it increased only 16.6% from the second quarter, despite the substantial increase in oil prices.

Profit in CVX's non-U.S. production segment, accounting for about two-thirds of its total output, declined 37.7% year-over-year but increased about 12% quarterly. Its U.S. production earnings increased 26.4% quarterly but declined 39% year-over-year.

The U.S. net oil-equivalent production was up 20% year-over-year and set a new quarterly record, primarily due to the acquisition of PDC Energy, Inc., which supplemented the quarter's output with an additional 179,000 oil-equivalent barrels per day, and net production increases in the Permian Basin.

The stock trades lower than the 50-, 100-, and 200-day moving averages, indicating a downtrend. However, Wall Street analysts expect the stock to reach $189 in the next 12 months, indicating a potential upside of 30.9%. The price target ranges from a low of $166 to a high of $215.

Institutions hold roughly 71.4% of CVX shares. Of the 3,473 institutional holders, 1,718 have increased their positions in the stock. Moreover, 203 institutions have taken new positions (9,253,853 shares).

For the fiscal fourth quarter ending December 2023, analysts expect its revenue and EPS to come at $54.46 billion and $3.68, respectively.

Considering the oil stocks’ tepid price momentum, mixed analyst estimates, and financials, it could be wise to wait for a better entry point in the stocks.