Top Performing ETFs in 2019

With the S&P 500 (SPX) ending the year up 28.9%, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJI) rose 22.3%, and the NASDAQ (IXIC) increased by 35.2% in 2019, much of the year it felt like no matter what you were invested in you were making money. And for the most part, that was true. Some investors made more than others because they had picked what would become the ETF winners of the year.

Did you see market returns, or were you invested in the ETFs that beat the averages and in some cases by a lot? Let’s take a look at the top five best performing ETFs of 2019 in several different categories the average investor has to choose from.

The following table shows the performance of the top five best performing ETFs in 2019, as well as their performance over the last month, the previous three months, the last five and ten years.

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The following table shows the performance of the top five Non-Leveraged ETFs in 2019, as well as their performance over the last month, the previous three months, the last five and ten years.

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The following table shows the performance of the top five Equity Non-Leveraged ETFs in 2019, as well as their performance over the last month, the last three months, the last five and ten years. Continue reading "Top Performing ETFs in 2019"

Top 25 ETFs To Have Owned Over The Last Decade

The table below is a list of the 25-top performing ETFs over the last ten years. As you will see, the majority of the Exchange Traded Funds on this list produced returns of 15% or more on an annualized basis, with the top ETF returning more than 19% a year on average over the past decade. That would equate to roughly a 250% return before any dividends or fees.

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Continue reading "Top 25 ETFs To Have Owned Over The Last Decade"

Thankful For Another Great Year On Wall Street

This past Thanksgiving, millions of Americans sat at the dinner table and proclaimed what they were thankful for. For some, it was loved ones, new family members, a promotion at work or a new job altogether, but at the very least, the food that was about to be eaten was mentioned. The success of the stock market in 2019 was undoubtedly one of mine, but I may be in the minority when it comes to people who said such out loud.

However, with the major indexes again trading at new all-time highs, something we have now had occur more than 20 times in 2019, 18 times in 2018, 62 times in 2017 and another 126 times from the start of 2013 until the end of 2016, its hard not to think about how much further this bull market can run.

Adding new money to the market seems very risky today based on how far the market has come the past few years and considering we have seen so many new all-time highs over the past few years.

However, new all-time highs is a very normal thing for the market. Since 1928, the U.S. stock market has seen new all-time highs on 5% of the trading days. Think about that! That’s on average, one in every 20 trading days, the U.S. stock market is hitting an all-time high. From that perspective, a new all-time high sort of seems like not that big of a deal.

Another crazy thought is that since World War II, the U.S. stock market has spent nearly 40% of its time within 5% of all-time highs. Ok, so almost half the time stocks are trading within reach of an all-time high. Furthermore, 54% of the time stocks are trading within 10% of all-time highs.

However, that means 46% of the time stocks were more than double digits below their highs. Continue reading "Thankful For Another Great Year On Wall Street"

2 Out Of 3 Americans Are Involved In this Industry

Roughly 2.5 billion people around the world play video games, which includes two out of every three Americans per research from the newest Exchange Traded Fund manager Roundhill Investments. Deloitte's research showed $4.5 billion was invested in the eSports industry in 2018 alone, which represented an 818% increase from 2017. Currently, 454 million people watch eSports events, and estimates have that number growing to 645 million by 2022. The global gaming market is expected to hit $152 billion by the end of 2019, a 10% year-over-year growth rate.

The rise of multiplayer battle royale games such as ‘Fortnite,’ increased technology, which includes higher internet speeds, virtual reality headsets, increased processing power. It’s also ushered in the ability to allow gamers to use multiple devices to access games that have been key drivers in changing the industry. In the past, the industry relied on single gaming consoles sales or single games to bring in all the revenue. Today we have in-game purchases; massive esports arena’s selling out for tournaments, advertising revenue from watching streaming video of other players competing in games.

While the video gaming industry has been around for decades, the investment opportunities have never been as good as they are today, especially because from most accounts, it would appear the next catalyst for growth is still in its infancy stages today.

Currently, five Exchange Traded Funds focus on the gaming industry and allow you the opportunity to buy into this industry that could see massive growth over the next decade. Let’s take a look at your options. Continue reading "2 Out Of 3 Americans Are Involved In this Industry"

Zero Fee Trades Likely Means Lower Fee ETFs - Part 2

Now that its clear investors understand how fees affect their returns and the financial industry as a whole is responding by lowering trading commissions to zero and cutting management fees on funds, its just a matter of time until we see ‘indexed’ funds begin to offer zero or near zero, as in 0.01% expense ratio, fee funds.

Why? Simple because they have to stay competitive if they want to stay in business.

For years the biggest argument for one someone would buy an index fund is because it would be so cumbersome and costly to go out and buy a few shares of all the different stocks that make up a specific index. For example, if an investor wanted to mimic the Dow Jones Industrial Average, they would need to go out and buy one share of each of the 30 companies that currently make up the index.

In the past, that would be 30 different stocks in someone’s personal portfolio, which honestly isn’t that much higher than what the average retail investor owns, typically somewhere between 15 and 20. However, that would also mean the investor would have paid a trading commission 30 different times in order to set up that portfolio (1 trading commission for each different company they bought a share or multiple shares of). If the average investor was paying $4.95 per trade, that’s $148.50 in trading commissions just so they could mimic the Dow Jones Industrial Average without having to pay a mutual fund or ETFs fees every year. Continue reading "Zero Fee Trades Likely Means Lower Fee ETFs - Part 2"