Knowing Your Way Around A Chart

If you follow our blog, then you are definitely familiar with trader Larry Levin, President of Trading Advantage LLC. We have gotten such a great response from some of his past posts that he has agreed to share one more of his favorite trading tips as a special treat to our viewers. Determining the direction of the market can be tricky and just plain confusing at times, but Larry’s expert opinion keeps it simple and straight-to-the-point.

If you like this article, Larry’s also agreed to give you free access to his award winning book.

Today he’s going to talk about knowing your way around a chart.

For most traders, charts are like their road maps to potential trades. Technicians see potential patterns, key clues that they interpret for trading opportunities. Fundamentalists see confirmation of news stories or supply and demand dynamics playing out in the price fluctuations. Charts are indispensable to traders

Understanding what a chart is telling you is paramount for traders

We are going to look at the two most common chart types, and the basics of their construction. The main thing to understand when you are looking at any given chart is that there is key info that shouldn't change. Each chart will be showing you prices on one axis and time periods on another. Most charts will show the prices on the vertical axis and time periods (e.g. daily, hourly, five minute) on the horizontal one, like this: Continue reading "Knowing Your Way Around A Chart"

Candlestick Patterns – Harami

If you follow our blog, then you are definitely familiar with trader Larry Levin, President of Trading Advantage LLC. We have gotten such a great response from some of his past posts that he has agreed to share one more of his favorite trading tips as a special treat to our viewers. Determining the direction of the market can be tricky and just plain confusing at times, but Larry’s expert opinion keeps it simple.

If you like this article, Larry’s also agreed to give you free access to his award winning book.

I've already covered some of the better known patterns like Doji and Engulfing – now it's time to add Harami to your candlestick chart pattern arsenal. Let's take a look at what this technical signal looks like, and what opportunities might be presenting themselves when you see it.

Harami patterns can be bearish or bullish

Harami, like engulfing patterns, are a two candlestick formation. They are actually often confused with engulfing patterns because they both involve candles where one real body is bigger than the other. The difference is that in harami, the preceding (or first) candle in the pattern is the longer one of the pair; it encompasses the whole body of the second candlestick. Continue reading "Candlestick Patterns – Harami"

Candlestick Patterns - Engulfing

If you follow our blog, then you are definitely familiar with trader Larry Levin, President of Trading Advantage LLC. We have gotten such a great response from some of his past posts that he has agreed to share one more of his favorite trading tips as a special treat to our viewers. Determining the direction of the market can be tricky and just plain confusing at times, but Larry’s expert opinion keeps it simple.

If you like this article, Larry’s also agreed to give you free access to his award winning book.

Candlestick charts have all kinds of potential patterns that technicians are watchful for. One of the easiest to spot is an engulfing pattern. This set-up consists of two candlesticks, one of which is “engulfing” the previous one. That means the body of the second candlestick is longer than the first one. It doesn’t have to extend beyond the wicks of that first candlestick, just the real body. period of time. Continue reading "Candlestick Patterns - Engulfing"

Candlesticks - Using the Doji

If you follow our blog, then you are definitely familiar with trader Larry Levin, President of Trading Advantage LLC. We have gotten such a great response from some of his past posts that he has agreed to share one more of his favorite trading tips as a special treat to our viewers. Determining the direction of the market can be tricky and just plain confusing at times, but Larry’s expert opinion keeps it simple.

If you like this article, Larry’s also agreed to give you free access to his award winning book.

On a candlestick chart, there is a pattern that technicians refer to as a doji. A doji has top and bottom shadows like a regular candlestick, but has practically no real body. This happens when the opening and closing price are the same, or so close that they just leave a sliver of a real body. A doji looks like a plus sign or cross.

Finding a Doji can tell a technical analyst key things about a market trend

Doji are considered a good sign of indecision in a market. Finding a doji with short and nearly identical shadow points suggests a neutral trading session. The market opened, had a small trading range, and then closed at the opening price. Neither bulls nor bears got the upper hand. Longer shadows show potentially greater indecision. They are neutral on their own, but paired with a trend, a doji can hint at a coming change.

Market participants looking for a reversal like to see Doji

Doji are like little battle scars of conflict. The trade had action but in the end no one won the day and the market closed pretty much where it started. If the market was on a bullish trend, this could be a signal that the bears were coming in. The opposite could be deduced if the market was in a bearish trend.

A technician's reversal argument is simple. If the dominant trend were still in control, there wouldn't have been a wrestling match for control. And there would have been a clear winner. Instead, the real body showed that the day was almost a wash. Continue reading "Candlesticks - Using the Doji"

Everything You Have Ever Wanted To Know About Candlestick Charts

In today's video, I will be talking about candlestick charts and just how powerful they are when they are used correctly. This form of charting began centuries ago in Japan, where rice merchants used candlestick charts to track the price of rice, a major commodity in that country.

Unlike Western charts, Japanese candlestick charts can have colorful names and modern interpretations can have colorful candlestick bodies to better highlight price movements. The candlesticks are normally made up of a "body" and an upper and lower "shadow" (or "wick").

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Today, I am offering my PDF booklet, "17 Money Making Candlestick Formations You Can Use Today In MarketClub."

If you don't already have a copy of this e-book that shows you all 17 major candlestick formations, give us a call at 1- 800-538-724, extension 106 or 410-867-2100, extension 106. You may also email support@ino.com.

Enjoy the video and put the power of candlestick charts to work for you today.

Every success and thanks for watching.

Adam Hewison
President, INO.com
Co-Creator, MarketClub